Here you see the videoclips of Neutral without air. The videos are taken using a flexible endoscope inserted via the nose. Stroboscopic light is used so the vibration of the vocal folds can be seen in slow motion. The flashing of the stroboscopic light is triggered using the Laryngograph signal. This is obtained by placing two electrodes placed on the neck over the larynx and the waveform can be seen as a a green moving line at the bottom of the image.  When the vocal folds are vibrating and touch each other the green line rises and when they peel apart the line falls creating the change in shape of the waveform.

In the video example below notice the  non-metallic and ‘clear’ character of the sound and the visual appearance and waveform of Neutral without air.

In Neutral without air you can see that there is no gap between the vocal folds. Be aware that when a rigid scope with stroboscopy is used it may sometimes look like there is a gap between the folds, but this is only visible posteriorly and at certain points in the vibratory cycle. To distinguish Neutral with air from Neutral without air first check to see if a gap can be identified (level 1). In Neutral without air and Neutral with air you can see that the posterior pharyngeal wall behind the larynx and hypopharynx is relaxed leaving the area open. The vocal folds can be seen easily as the false cords are retracted and the aryepiglottic folds are stretched more and tensed so they become thinner creating a funnel shape which is slightly steeper in Neutral without air than in Neutral with air.

The Neutral without air laryngograph waveform shows a shallower upward (closing) and downward (opening) curve compared to the sinusoidal waveform with occasional spike seen in Neutral with air. This corespond nicely with the louder volume often used in Neutral without air compared to Neutral with air. When compared to the metallic modes,  the waveform is frequently bell shaped and symmetrical and the overall contact time is reduced which means that the gaps (when the vocal folds are apart) are shorter.

 

Sustained single notes in Neutral without air

The first video is a male singing on a sustained single note (C4, 250 Hz) on the vowel EE (as in ‘see’) in Neutral without air.

 

This video is a female singing on a sustained single note (Bb4, 460 Hz) on the vowel EE (as in ‘see’) in Neutral with air.

 

Song in Neutral with air

This video  is a male singing the first four bars of “Somewhere over the rainbow” in Neutral with air.

 

This  video is a female singing the first four bars of “Somewhere over the rainbow” in Neutral with air

 

Glissando in Neutral with air

This video is a male singing a glissando from low pitch to high pitch returning to low pitch again on the vowel AH (as in ‘far’) in Neutral with air. Notice that the waveform stays the same through the Neutral with air pitches  – it just gets narrower as the pitch increases.

 

This video is a female singing a glissando from low pitch to high pitch returning to low pitch again on the vowel EE (as in ‘see’) vowel, in Neutral with air. Notice that the shape of the waveform stays the same through the Neutral with air pitches – it just gets narrower as the pitch increases.

 

This  information comes from a study Visual Vocal Mode Test Study on video, with the title  ‘Laryngeal gestures and Laryngograph data associated with the four vocal modes as described in the Complete Vocal Technique method of singing teaching.’ This study has not yet been presented.